Mandela family mark end of mourning period

IMG_0432The family of former president Nelson Mandela spent the weekend in Qunu in the Eastern Cape to mark the end of the mourning period.

The mourning period ended six months after Mandela was buried in Qunu on December 15th 2013

A cleansing ceremony was performed in Qunu on Sunday (15th June 2014) where traditional beer and meat was prepared for the family members. The elders of the Mandela family have also addressed other family members.

Former presidents daughter, Zindzi Mandela said, “There is so much beauty and wisdom in our cultural practices and every routine experience teaches us new lessons.”

She confirmed that her mother, Winnie Madikezela Mandela’s black clothes that she wore during her 6 month mourning period were burnt by the Madiba elders on the Saturday (14th June 2014) evening , symbolising a new beginning with the acceptance of Madiba’s passing.

Zindzi Mandela added, “The Madikizelas took over today’s ceremony by dressing my mother in new traditional garb whilst bearing gifts for the Mandela elders. According to our traditional protocols, a new bedroom suite was bought which will replace her old bed. It was rewarding to be with both the Madikizela and Mandela families and the community of Qunu, with lots of laughter, food and traditional songs.”

For more information please mail media@mandelalegacy.com or visit www.mandelalegacy.com

 

 

Hello Doctor – Interview with Zoleka Mandela

Zoleka MandelaIn South Africa, and around the world, there’s always been a lot of focus on Nelson Mandela, but in this episode our focus shifts to Zoleka Mandela, Madiba’s granddaughter. She tells her story of what it’s like to be a Mandela, and how it doesn’t mean you’re sheltered from the hardships and challenges that many other South Africans face every day.

 

 

 

Press Statement: Film based on UNAUTHORISED biography of Winnie Mandela

In my life’s struggle I have seen and heard many things said about me. I understand that my story, alongside that of my people is one that will continue to be told for many generations.

In an attempt to ensure that my truth was reflected, I reached out to the film makers of “Winnie Mandela” – my advances were rejected. I imagine the basis was to allow the creative process to occur organically- a concept I try to understand. I respect all creative efforts to make this story one that would appeal to a global audience as well as yield commercial gains for all those who invested in it.

In principle, I have no “problem” with the Winnie Mandela film while it remains important to me that my life story be portrayed accurately. I appreciate that this would require the utmost integrity of the storytellers but, my story is mine and no one knows it better.

I also reject media reports that suggest that I have a problem with the international talent cast on this film.
Unlike “Long Walk To Freedom”, this film is based on an UNAUTHORISED biography whose producers did not deem it fit to consult me or my family. My family and I are therefore not associated with this production.Sincerely,

Issued: From the Office of Mrs NW Madikizela- Mandela

24 February 2014
www.winniemandela.co.za

Zindzi Mandela takes to Twitter over Winnie

Zindzi and her mother Winnie Madikizela-Mandela. (Photo: file,AP)

Zindzi and her mother Winnie Madikizela-Mandela. (Photo: file,AP)

Cape Town – Nelson Mandela’s daughter Zindzi has joined Twitter, starting with a series of tweets explaining why Winnie Madikizela-Mandela was left out of the former stateman’s will.

Zindzi joined the social media platform just under a week ago and has already gained more than 1 200 followers.

She said that media reports about why her mother was left out of the will were mischievous and sensationalist.

“She never attended the reading of the will as she didn’t regard herself as a beneficiary,” Zindzi tweeted.

“Why would she expect to be maintained after his passing when she was never maintained during his lifetime?”

She said Winnie would continue to mourn her ex-husband’s death while “according to traditional protocols whilst holding Mama Graca’s hand throughout this difficult period”.

By late on Tuesday afternoon, Zindzi was trending in Johannesburg.

Source

Mandela’s granddaughter launches book on her struggles

The family of the anti-apartheid icon Nelson Mandela is often in the public eye. This year alone, his ex-wife Winnie Madikizela-Mandela released a book, his granddaughters starred in a reality TV series and a film based on his autobiography, also premiered in South Africa. Now Zoleka Mandela, Mandela’s granddaughter, has launched a book about her battle with drug addiction and cancer.

 

Zoleka Mandela inspirational journey of loss, hope and faith

image_body_top-220x300When you ask Zoleka Mandela how she’s enjoyed her 32 weeks of pregnancy so far her beaming smile – if bottled – could surely generate enough light to power a small household for the night. She will lean in nearer and tell you in hushed tones of excitement how blessed she feels and what a miracle the baby inside her is. To truly appreciate Zoleka’s infectious joy and boundless hope, you need to understand that her journey has been tough to say the least. She wants you to know that when she reached her lowest point, fractured by years of running from bad choices, she clawed her life back in the midst of the most inconceivable loss. “I want to be an example of what is possible, I want to show people that no matter how far down the road you think you are there is always hope.”

RAISED A MANDELA
Despite the fact that her parents were in a relationship for ten years, they parted ways when Zoleka was only a toddler and she has no memory of a time when they were a couple. She is the only child of her biological parents and has one half-brother and five half-sisters from her parents’ subsequent marriages respectively. “Because my parents never married, and my father never paid inhlawulo or ‘damages’ for making my mother pregnant – which is our African tradition – I was named and raised as a Mandela.” Zoleka’s earliest memories are of living with her aunt Zenani – the eldest daughter of Nelson and Winnie Mandela – and her cousins in Swaziland. She recalls her earliest memory of her fourth birthday and remembers missing her mother that day.
Zoleka’s mother Zindzi is the second-born and chose to send her daughter to her sister in Swaziland while she studied at the University of Cape Town. “My mother was also more politically active and that period must have been a far too dangerous one for me to be living at home in Soweto,” Zoleka explains. Eventually the young girl would be reunited with her mother and grandmother in Soweto when Zenani left Swaziland for the USA. “I was five at the time,” she continues, “and would have been quite relieved and happy to befinally reunited with my mother and grandmother.”

Read more about Zoleka’s journey in our April 2014 issue.

‘Forever young’ Winnie warmly welcomed to the Twitterverse

By SIYA BOYA on October 17, 2013

Dispatch Online

THOUSANDS of South Africans were thrilled to welcome “mother of the nation” Winnie Madikizela-Mandela to Twitter on Saturday, resulting in her trending on Tuesday night.

The struggle veteran, who signs her tweets “WM”, has not been shy about her latest activities and had tweeted 79 times at the time of print.

With the @winniemandela handle, she had 4 756 followers, a number that is fast growing.

She is following 83 people, which includes South African politicians across a broad spectrum, Bafana Bafana, the Springboks and South African pop musician Danny K, as well as most of the Mandela family and international politicians like Hillary Clinton.

The Trendsmap website http://trendsmap.com/za , which analyses tweet flows using algorithms, tweeted on Tuesday night that @winniemandela was trending in South Africa. Her tweets include:

(To Walter Sisulu’s grandson Shaka) “@ shakasisulu Molo mzukulwana. Unqabile ekhaya. Ndiva kusithiwa uyawusebendzela umbutho woo tatomkhulu benu. Phambili!” (Hello grandson. You are scarce at home. I hear that you are working for the organisation of your grandfathers. Go forth!)

(To South African “tweleb” Khaya Dlanga) @khayadlanga my grand children tell me you are vocal young man. Molo mzukulwana!”

May god bless you & your dear ones with peace, prosperity & happiness on the auspicious occasion of Eid-ulAdha. Happy Eid to all Muslims! WM

Different people took the time to welcome her.

Media mogul and Power fm owner Given Mkhari @MkhariGiven: “Forever young @winniemandela on twitter! Welcome mama!”

“Gareth Cliff @GarethCliff: “Welcome Mama!”

Nobel Peace Prize winner Desmond Tutu had his Twitter account briefly suspended for “aggressively following” other users, just hours after it was launched. —

Winnie Mandela releases prison journal

Johannesburg – Nelson Mandela’s ex-wife Winnie on Thursday released a book about her detention by the apartheid regime, a time she described as the darkest part of her life.

The book 491 Days: Prisoner number 1323/69 is based on a journal Winnie Madikizela-Mandela kept in prison during her detention.

“In my mind I felt that we needed to tell the story to the future generations, so that what happened there never happens again,” she said at the launch in Johannesburg.

In the book Winnie shares some of her journal entries as well as letters between her husband and herself.

“Solitary confinement is worse than hard labour,” she said.

“When you stretch your hands you touch the walls, you are reduced to a nobody.”

The book details her harrowing isolated confinement for over a year after security police detained her at her Soweto home on 12 May 1969.

An anti-apartheid activist in her own right, she was held at Pretoria Central Prison with a group of other fighters under the notorious Terrorism Act.

Her then-husband Nelson Mandela had already been in prison for almost seven years by then.

A lawyer’s widow had the journal, and returned it to Madikizela-Mandela 41 years after her release on 14 September 1970.

She said reading the journal brought back painful memories about the suffering she, her family and her two children Zindzi and Zenani – then little girls -experienced.

“I could only read one paragraph and put it away,” she said.

“Words cannot describe the feelings and the pain, especially now that their father is in hospital,” she said.

Nelson Mandela, 95, marked two months in hospital on Thursday, where he is undergoing treatment for a serious lung infection.

The pair divorced in 1996, two years after he became South Africa’s first black president.

Winnie Mandela is still revered as mother of the nation, despite her implication in the death of activists on the eve of apartheid’s end and a corruption conviction a decade later.